Another Version of Down Sizing

I picked this us from the Wall Street Journal online recently, and I thought I’d share this since it caught my attention. The prefabricated modern Minneapolis home of Kaywin Feldman, the director of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and her husband, Jim Lutz. Photo: David Bowman for The Wall Street Journal.

When Kaywin Feldman moved here to take a job as the director of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, she knew it would be difficult to replace her home in Memphis. Designed by a student of famed architect Louis Kahn, it was a 1950s-built midcentury modern that she and her husband, Jim Lutz, an architecture professor, had worked to restore and improve over nine years.

After looking at nearly 30 homes, Ms. Feldman finally found another modern house with a boxy exterior and glass walls. But this one had a different provenance. Constructed five years ago in a Wisconsin factory and installed in a few weeks on-site, it was a “weeHouse,” one of a series of prefabricated homes designed by local architects Geoffrey Warner and Scott Ervin of Alchemy Architects.

Call, text, or email me today!

I’d seriously enjoy having the opportunity to talk to you about your plans if you’re moving, or if you know someone who is considering a move, and needs some straight answers.

At 2,900 square feet, the four-bedroom, three-bathroom house is one of the largest of the series—the couple jokingly refer to it as their “not so wee house.” Located in the Linden Hills neighborhood, which is lined with more-traditional early 20th-century homes, the house is made up of four glass-and-cedar modular units stacked just slightly off-center, with small cantilevers, topped by a flat roof.

The interior layout is straightforward: living areas on the first floor, bedrooms on the second. There are bamboo floors and mostly white walls throughout, creating a neutral background for the couple’s collection of contemporary photography, folk art and midcentury furniture. “It’s my world,” said Ms. Feldman. “Our museum is all white walls.”

On the main level, where the couple frequently entertains, there’s a mixture of art and objects including a photograph by William Eggleston and a basket woven from kudzu. In the dining room, a long wooden dining table with a glass top from B & B Italia is surrounded by chairs by Philippe Starck. Mr. Lutz creates elaborate table place settings here using the couple’s Charles Gwathmey-designed dinnerware, candlesticks and accessories. The upstairs master suite has a balcony overlooking a small backyard and a row of windows along two walls that give it a “treehouse feel,” said Ms. Feldman.

But one of the home’s major selling points was its lower-level den. With high ceilings and small windows, it had sufficient space and floor strength to install a industrial-shelving system that can accommodate the couple’s collection of more than 10,000 books. On everything from ancient Asian art to contemporary architecture, the books are organized roughly by topic—and strictly by owner. Her collection occupies one half of the room and his, the other.

Zachary Epps, GRI, ABR, REALTOR®, Eco-Broker®, full-time RE/MAX professional,

and author of the

Boulder Real Estate and Neighborhood Guide,

The Boulder Condo Guide, and The Home Buyer’s Handbook.

Call, text, or email me today! … I’d seriously enjoy having the opportunity to talk to you about your plans if you’re moving, or if you know someone who is considering a move, and needs some straight answers.

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